Budapestrulle, Swedish hazelnut and raspberry roll

  Budapestrulle, Swedish raspberry hazelnut roll

I came back from Sweden a few days ago, but I was a bit late in coming back here. I wanted it to be with a gourmet recipe and I wanted to make you a nice cake seen in a pastry shop in Stockholm. The Budapestrulle, rolled from Budapest, as its name does not indicate, is indeed a Swedish specialty.
This cake was terribly appetizing. Anyway, we were in the shop to buy a princesstorta, another Swedish cake, perfect for birthdays. So, we didn’t taste it, but I noted the name, and did some research on the recipe. It consists of a hazelnut meringue cookie, whipped cream and normally tangerine wedges. In this season, the raspberry version is more appropriate.

This cake will be perfect this season, because it is really easy and quick to make. In addition, it is light in the mouth, and will therefore end a meal deliciously.

Budapestrule:

Hazelnut cake:

5 egg whites
150g sugar
125g hazelnut powder
40g cornstarch

Preheat the oven to 170°C.

Beating egg whites.
When the whips start to leave traces, add the sugar little by little, while continuing to whip.
Mix the hazelnut powder and cornstarch.
Add this mixture to the meringue gently, using a spatula.

Spread this mixture in a Flexipat type roll mold or on a plate covered with a baking sheet.

Cook for 15/20 minutes. The cake must remain flexible under the finger.
Let it cool. Cover with a baking sheet.

  Budapestrulle, Swedish raspberry hazelnut roll

Trim:

200g full cream
100g mascarpone
1 tbsp icing sugar
raspberries

Whip the very cold cream, the mascarpone and the icing sugar into whipped cream.

Unmold the cake by turning it over on the baking sheet.
Spread this mousse and raspberries on the cold cake.
Roll up using the baking sheet to make it easier.

Book cool.

For decoration, make a few lines of melted chocolate or sprinkle with a veil of icing sugar. Add a few raspberries on top.

  Budapest roll, sweden Budapest roll

To finish: the cake is reminiscent of the dacquoise. I keep this recipe for Christmas, because it can be very nice for logs.
And then, at that time, you will also have to try the mandarin version.

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